©

Deleting everything in Onetab feels really great.

9 good bits from Adam Phillips’ Paris Review interview

austinkleon:

1) “I had never had any desire to be a writer. I wanted to be a reader.”

2) “One thing you discover in psychoanalytic treatment is the limits of what you can change about yourself or your life. We are children for a very long time.”

3) “Fortunately, I never recovered from my education, I’ve just carried on with it. If you happen to like reading, it can have a very powerful effect on you, an evocative effect, at least on me. It’s not as though when I read I’m gathering information, or indeed can remember much of what I read. I know the books that grip me, as everybody does, but their effect is indiscernible. I don’t quite know what it is. The Leavisite position, more or less, is that reading certain sentences makes you more alive and a morally better person, and that those two things go together. It seems to me that that isn’t necessarily so, but what is clear is that there are powerful unconscious evocative effects in reading books that one loves. There’s something about these books that we want to go on thinking about, that matters to us. They’re not just fetishes that we use to fill gaps. They are like recurring dreams we can’t help thinking about.”

4) “You can only recover your appetite, and appetites, if you can allow yourself to be unknown to yourself.”

5) “That’s what a life is, it’s the lives you don’t have.”

6) “I hope you read one of my books because it gives you pleasure or because you hate it—you read it for those sorts of reasons—and then you discover what you find yourself thinking, feeling, in the reading of it.”

7) “You can’t write differently, even if you want to. You just have to be able to notice when you are boring yourself.”

8) “Anybody who writes knows you don’t simply write what you believe. You write to find out what you believe, or what you can afford to believe.”

9) “[I]f you live in a culture which is fascinated by the myth of the artist, and the idea that the vocational artistic life is one of the best lives available, then there’s always going to be a temptation for people who are suffering to believe that to become an artist would be the solution when, in fact, it may be more of the problem. There are a number of people whom you might think of as casualties of the myth of the artist. They really should have done something else. Of course some people get lucky and find that art works for them, but for so many people it doesn’t. I think that needs to be included in the picture. Often one hears or reads accounts in which people will say, Well, he may have treated his children, wives, friends terribly, but look at the novels, the poems, the paintings. I think it’s a terrible equation. Obviously one can’t choose to be, as it were, a good parent or a good artist, but if the art legitimates cruelty, I think the art is not worth having. People should be doing everything they can to be as kind as possible and to enjoy each other’s company. Any art, any anything, that helps us do that is worth having. But if it doesn’t, it isn’t.’

Such a good read.

(Update: my friend Mark Larson has a great AdamPhillips tag.)

http://tumblr.austinkleon.com/post/89282768421
Teleport 2 Me
Kid Cudi
http://iamsenshi.tumblr.com/post/91804589896
http://justice4mikebrown.tumblr.com/post/96263333410/aug-31-10-28-am
http://blackfashion.tumblr.com/post/94579828308/farhia-24-toronto-submitted

tsabe:

The Animated Self Portrait 

T.S Abe

http://www.tsabe.co.uk
BaBopBye Ya
The ArchAndroid
Janelle Monáe

asleepwhileawake:

Janelle Monáe - BaBopBye Ya

http://asleepwhileawake.tumblr.com/post/49479901601

devilthrones:

"For one thing, there’s Dido’ fetishization by the two Ashford brothers. While one brother sees her simply as an exotic "other" whom he can bed without forming attachments — very different from the attitude toward white women of the same time period, whose virtue was unequivocal and untouchable — the other is downright violent in his conception of Dido, calling her "repulsive" but still expressing a desire to rape her. The scenes in which that older, more violent Ashford brother addresses Dido directly, giving voice to his unbridled racism and at one point assaulting her, are indisputably disturbing, not just because they represent a disgusting and brutal history but because I see remnants of those attitudes today in the way the world perceives the bodies of black and brown women: exotic, sexual, sensual, different objects. We see it in the way Miley Cyrus and almost any given white pop star (Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke, for example) use black women’s bodies as props in music videos: as something to be appropriated and used for one’s own pleasure and then cast off in pursuit of the next trend. In addition, the rape of black women still does not seem to carry much horror in 2014; it was most recently a punchline on Saturday Night Live, and last year Russell Simmons was forced to apologize for his highly offensive "Harriet Tubman Sex Tape." None of this is too different from the way the Ashford brothers perceive Dido’s body: as an exotic "other" not worthy of love or respect but merely of lust, and lust framed in a particularly problematic racism."

 Belle: A Lesson in the Timelessness of Racism and Misogyny Against Black Women by Olivia Cole 

http://devilthrones.tumblr.com/post/94457537255/for-one-thing-theres-dido-fetishization-by-the

hoodfuturism:

childish-gamzeno:

YES YES YES YEA

SQUAD

http://hoperesideswithinthismess.tumblr.com/post/95219421851
Come to Me
Koop